… or at least, a quote good enough to make me come out of hiding before I’ve explained why things have been so quiet around here.

John Gruber on the iPhone IDE debacle:

If you are constitutionally opposed to developing for a platform where you’re expected to follow the advice of the platform vendor, the iPhone OS is not the platform for you. It never was. It never will be.

To all the people whinging about this decision by Apple, go away. You can have your fun on Android or some other platform that supports your open development philosophy. If by some fluke Apple wind up with a such a massive majority that you’re forced to come back because all the users are here, don’t expect any sympathy from us. It will have happened because Apple’s restrictions resulted in the most consistent mobile OS experience, and users decided that’s what they want.

iPhone is a closed system, and in my opinion the overall quality of the apps available is better for it. Not that the app store is full of fantastic quality at the moment – you really need an iPod or iPhone to appreciate this, but the store has an amazing amount of crap already.

However I can see the app store really going down the toilet if they let “meta-platform” (as Gruber calls them) apps onto the store. Just look at what happens when people develop cross-platform apps for PC; you either target one primary OS and optimise your UI for it at the expense of the others, or target a general use case and suffer for having a non-native UI. Yes there are exeptions, but they are rare and most of them spend stupid amounts of time implementing multiple native UIs in their cross-platform code.

Gruber has a specific example of this:

Consider, for one example, Amazon’s Kindle clients for iPhone OS and Mac OS X. The iPhone OS Kindle app is excellent, a worthy rival in terms of experience to Apple’s own iBooks. The Mac Kindle app is a turd that doesn’t look, feel, or behave like a real Mac app. The iPhone OS Kindle app is a native iPhone app, written in Cocoa Touch. The Mac Kindle app was produced using the cross-platform Qt toolkit.

Native apps are always better; I don’t use OpenOffice more because the UI pisses me off than because iWork is cheap enough that I don’t mind paying for it. Windows is the same (I can’t stand Apple’s apps ported to Windows with Mac-style keyboard shortcuts). Once you allow cross-platform UIs to enter your computing world, life just isn’t as much fun anymore.

And I want my iPhone to be fun.

[update: A related article with an appropriate quote, this time from MacWorld].

… the develop-once-run-anywhere philosophy is something that makes more sense to bean counters and development-environment vendors than it does to platform owners and discriminating users. In the ’90s we were told that Java apps would be the future of software, because you could write them once and deploy them anywhere. As someone who used to use a Java-based Mac app on an almost daily basis, let me tell you: it was a disaster. Java apps didn’t behave like Mac apps.